Cerebral Palsy Teatment

The Postnatal Period


The moment of birth signals the end of nine months of development and anticipation. Of course, it is also called a neonate, and parents will go home to begin their new life together. First however the staff at the hospital or birthing center must make sure the new family gets off to a good start.

Examining the Newborn

Shortly after delivery, the neonate's physical condition is evaluated using a rating system called then Apgar scale. the infant is given are rating from 0 to 2 on each of five item : pulse , breathing , muscle tone , responsiveness , and skin color . A total score 7 to 10 is considered normal. A lower score is a sign that the baby needs special medical attention. Usually the Apgar evaluation is given one minute after birth. The baby is also given a brief examination to check for any conditions that would require special care. Within 60 minutes of delivery, drops of silver nitrate or an antiseptic ointment are put in the baby's eyes to guard again infection. The baby is weighed, measured, and perhaps washed. A permanent copy of the baby's foot -prints are made for public record. Two bands giving the baby's family name are clamped to the wrists or ankles. The mother wears a bracelet which contains the same information. Identification is done before the baby leaves the delivery room or birthing room to avoid any mix- up in identity.

The Apgar Scale


SCORE

 

0

1

2

HEART RATE

Absent

Under 100

Over 100

BREATHING

Absent

Slow , irregular

Good , crying

MUSCLE TONE
(baby's reaction when nose is irritated)

Limp

Some movement of extremities

Active motion

RESPONSIVENESS

No response

Grimace

Cough or sneeze

COLOR

Blue or pale

Body pink, limbs blue

Completely pink



Signs of a Healthy Baby

Both appearance and behavior give clues to a baby's health:


FIRST YEAR AVERAGE MOTOR SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

Birth to twelve months


One month


Two months


Three to four months


Five to six months


Seven to eight months


Nine to ten months  


Eleven to twelve months


Average Cognition Development Birth to Twelve Months

One to two Months


Three to four Months


Five to six months


Seven to Eight Months


Nine to ten Months


Eleven to Twelve Months


SECOND YEAR AVERAGE MOTOR SKILLS DEVELOPMENT AGES ONE TO FOUR


Age

Large Motor Skills

Small Motor Skills

1 to 1½ YEARS

Improves from walking a few unsteady steps to walking well.
Slides down stairs backwards, one at a time.
Stoops to pick up toys.

Turn pages of a book, several pages at a time.
Picks up small objects easily using thumb and forefinger Scribbles.

1½ to 2 YEARS

Runs fairly well Can stand on one foot.
Learns to walk up and down stairs, holding on both feet on each step.
Throws objects overhand.

Buttons large buttons.
Pulls down zippers.
Turns door knobs.
Stacks several cubes to from a tower.

2 TO 2½ YEARS

Walks with more coordination and confidence.
Climbs, even in unsafe places. Jumps of bottom step.
Pushes self on wheeled toys.

Turn pages of a book one at time.

2½ TO 3 YEARS

Runs, but cannot stop accurately; runs into things.
Alternates feet going up stairs, but not going down.
Throws ball over head , but inaccurately.
Kicks balls.

Builds towers of about eight blocks.
Draws horizontal and vertical lines, circles.
Strings large beads.

3 to 4 YEARS

Jumps up and down.
Skips and hops,  Balances on one foot.
Walks on tiptoe. Rides a tricycle.
Catches a ball with arms straight.

Builds towers of about nine or ten blocks Makes a bridge of three blocks.
Cuts with scissors.
Draws recognizable pictures.
Uses a fork and spoon with little spilling.

Average Motor Skills Development Ages Four to Six

Four Years


Five Years


Six Years

 



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